SSC Income Tax Assistant – 2005 (English Language)

Staff Selection Commission
Income Tax/Central Excise Tax Assistant 2005
English Language

Direction (1-10): In questions 1 to 10 some of the sentences have errors and some have none. Find out which part of a sentence has an error and blacken the rectangle corresponding to the appropriate letter (a,b,c).

Direction (11-20): In question 11 to 20. Out of the four alternatives, choose the one which best expresses the meaning of the given word.

Direction (21-30): In questions 21 to 30, choose the word opposite in meaning to the given word.

Direction (31-40): In questions 31 to 40, four words are given in each question, out of which only one word is correctly spelt. Find the word.

Direction (41-50): In question 41 to 50, four alternatives are given for the given idiom/phrase. Choose the alternative which best expresses the meaning of the given idiom/phrase and mark it in the Answer Sheet.

Direction (51-55): In question 51 to 55, out of the four alternatives, choose the one which can be substituted for the given wards/sentence.

Direction (56-60): In question 56 to 60, the sentences have been in Active/Passive voice. From the given alternatives, choose the one which best expresses the given sentence in Passive/Active.

Direction (61-65): In question 61 to 65, a part of the sentence is underlined. Below are given alternatives to the underlined part at (a), (b) and (c) which may improve the sentence, choose the correct alternative. In case no improvement is needed, your answer is (d).

Direction (66-70): In questions 66 to 70, the first and the last sentences of the passage are numbered 1 and 6. The rest of the passage is split into four parts and named P, Q, R and S. These four parts are not given in their proper order. Read the sentence and find out which of the four combinations is correct. Then find the correct answer.

Direction (71-80): In the following passage, some of the words have been left out. First read the passage over and try to understand what it is about. Then fill in the blacks with the help of the alternatives given.

Direction (81-90): In questions 81 to 90, sentences are given with blanks to be filled in with an appropriate word(s). Four alternatives are suggested for each question, choose the correct alternative out of the four.

Direction (91-95): In questions 91 to 95, you have a brief passage with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

In the past 50 year, doctor across the world have accepted the practice to prescribe antibiotics at the first sign of a trivial infection or treat patients with a handful of antibiotics. These days, it is not uncommon to see practitioners prescribing multiple antibiotics without any real indication or relevance for such a combination of drugs. Antibiotics have traditionally been known as miracle, especially in countries like ours where there is easy access to drugs across the counter, including antibiotics. We cannot think of a return to pre-antibiotic days. Yet the unbridled use of these agents is inexorably propelling us in that direction.

Direction (96-100): In questions 95 to 100, you have a brief passage with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Among nature’s most intriguing phenomena are the partnerships formed by different species. The name use or these relationships, symbiosis, comes from Greek meaning “Living together”. Not all symbiotic relationships are the same. There are some called commensal relationships, in which one partner gains a benefit while the other gains little or none but is not harmed. One example is the relationship between two types of fish – remoras and sharks. The remora, which is long and often striped attaches itself to a shark (sometimes to another types of fish or a whale), using a sucker on its head. When the shark makes a kill, the hitchhiker briefly detaches itself to feed on the scraps. Another type of symbiotic relationship is parasitism, in which one partner benefits at the expense of others. Ticks and tapeworms are among familiar parasites. The third type of symbiotic relationship, called mutualism, is a true partnership in which both partners benefits. The relationship may be limited as when zebras and wild-beast graze together on the vast African grasslands. Each species can survive on its own, but together their chances of detecting predators are improved because each contributes a especially keen sense. (Zebras have the better eyesight; wild-best, hearing and sense of smell). In a few cases partners are so interdependent that one cannot survive without the other. Most mutualistic relationship probably lie somewhere in between.

Staff Selection Commission
Income Tax/Central Excise Tax Assistant 2005
English Language

SSC Income Tax Assistant – 2005 (English Language)
votes, 0.00 avg. rating (% score)
Rate This Post

Add a Comment

Get update on your mobile, download our android app free now.Download